Quick things:

Scroll down for the full list of what we’ll have this week! Check out the website for everything we’ve got right now!

Apropos nothing, at the end of a season Dusty and I often do “one last hurrah” meals — this was our one last caprese of the year. *sigh*

If you’ve bought anything in glass in the past month or so, you might have noticed that it came wrapped in pages of old issues of TheBurg magazine. This was something of a side effect of me trying to exert some control over one little corner of my life by re-organizing the living room. I didn’t get very far in that project, but I did pull several years of back issues of TheBurg off the shelves. I was kind of proud of the collection — every issue from 2019 and 2018, most of 2017, and a few from 2016. Somewhere I think I still have the issue from 2015 — probably October! — when their cartoon of the month was a little R&R/market-themed spoof on the pumpkin spice trend. “Pumpkin & Pumpkin” read the sign. We were a brand new baby business back then, and it was a major thrill to get a little recognition, even if it was satirical.

I didn’t use that issue to wrap any milk jugs, but I have gotten a lot of thrills over the past few weeks while packing orders as I’ve caught glimpses of articles about folks I know. On more than one occasion (like, kind of a lot of them), I’ve realized while packing an order that I’m literally wrapping someone’s pickles in an article about them. I mean, it’s not always pickles being wrapped, but it’s uncanny nonetheless. What weird coincidences! Or so I thought, until the day I was packing an order atop this 2018 piece from Burg editor-in-chief Larry Binda about community and TheBurg’s role in it — when I realized that the customer whose order I was packing was intimately connected with one of the anecdotes related in the article.

Ohhh, I thought, this isn’t coincidence, it’s community.

I was so tickled I had to stop and read the full article. Then I set it aside to reflect on later. This kind of impulse is how I wound up with three+ years of issues in my living room.

I’ve just spent more time than I should at 9pm on a Thursday night before I’ve stopped to eat dinner trying to articulate how poignant that moment was for me. I think it’s time for me to accept that I can’t articulate as I’d like to, except to say that it was a swell of gratitude for all of our overlapping orbits, closely followed by another swell of gratitude for TheBurg — for the hard work of Larry and Meg and Kelsey (and Lizzy!) and more contributors than I can name to find and report on what’s important in our little — or not so little — community. For keeping us connected.

If you read the Quick Things above, you might be thinking that I decided to write about TheBurg tonight because we’re now offering it (for free, of course) in the online store. The opposite, really, is closer to true. We’d been planning to talk to Larry about the store being a distribution point when it opened, but the realization of the role TheBurg can play also made me think, “Why wait?”

So there you have it. In this strange and crazy time when connection feels both more important and less tangible than ever, I’m all for anything (almost) that helps build it. And our cool little hometown monthly magazine/newspaper is definitely doing that. But you know what else is cool? TheBurg can help build community, but, more than anything, it’s really reflecting it. It’s cool because you’re cool. It’s cool because we’re cool. It’s pretty cool.

And it’s so freaking cool that we all get to be here together, living this crazy life, in this beautiful spot on earth, circling in and out of each other’s orbits, and generally, you know, being a community.

Thanks for being here.

-Julia

P.S. If you’ve been on the edge of your seat since last week’s installment of our POS saga, I don’t want to leave you hanging — we’ve worked out an acceptable interim solution and a really good-seeming longer term solution with the POS company we had originally planned on. Pros: we don’t have to wait months for onboarding and implementation with someone else; Cons: we are switching to a different product, and it will take a few weeks to complete that process, though they seem to be really on it and moving as fast as they can. I can’t fully exhale until the new equipment is here and working, but I’m definitely leaning towards feeling relieved.


Click here for the online store!